John Hertel: Michigan’s Latest Transit Victim?

By on January 23rd, 2014

Columns
Jack Lessenberry

Jack Lessenberry

John Hertel: Michigan’s Latest Transit Victim?

January 24, 2014

DETROIT – For a moment, it looked like the Detroit area had a good chance of getting a realistic and cost-effective system of mass transit for the first time in the region’s history. John Hertel, the longtime general manager of SMART, the efficient suburban bus system, was named in August to head the new Regional Transit Authority (RTA) for Southeastern Michigan. That came after Gov. Rick Snyder managed to get the state legislature to approve the RTA, which would have the authority to set up a system of fast buses with their own lanes.

Those buses – which actually look more like train cars –would whip passengers across Washtenaw, Wayne, Oakland and Macomb counties, including runs to the airport, Ann Arbor and downtown. The network would also be coordinated with the two existing bus systems: DDOT, which services the city of Detroit, and SMART. Once completed, the system would enable people without cars—primarily Detroiters—to get to places where the jobs are. Once launched, the system would serve mainly the suburbs, something virtually impossible now, since the bus systems are poorly coordinated and DDOT notoriously unreliable.

The RTA also would be a convenient way for business travelers to get to their destinations without fighting for a cab. Last spring, Hertel told me that Detroit was the nation’s only major metropolitan area without public transportation from the airport to downtown. “Out of 30 metro areas, we are the only one where you land at the airport and find, ‘You’re on your own, buddy.’” Not good for a community desperately in need of more business investment.

But this summer, Hertel, who combines devotion to public transportation with expertise in practical politics, told me he was as optimistic as he’s ever been. Practical mass transit is something he has wanted to see since the day in April, 1956, when he was nine, and his parents took him to ride the Detroit streetcars on their very last day of service.

When he took the job, he saw his primary task as persuading voters in the four counties to approve taxing themselves to build the system. That might not be an easy sell, but John Hertel has a track record of getting things done. Politically savvy, he has shepherded many a millage through to successful passage. Though a Democrat who served three terms in the state senate, Hertel has a track record of working well with and being trusted by both parties. He is also the only politician ever to have chaired both the Wayne and Macomb County Board of Commissioners. John had a plan.

But then, things fell apart.

Last week, the stunning news came that Hertel had resigned as head of the RTA, releasing a statement saying he felt he needed to remain at SMART. The suburban system is facing a millage renewal this summer, and he said he needed to concentrate on getting it passed. Leaving the RTA was not legally hard to do since he had never signed a contract, wasn’t taking any pay, and had never formally resigned from SMART. However, he knew about the millage renewal long before he agreed to take the new job with the regional agency.

So what really happened?

Hertel was not commenting, but it isn’t hard to piece the story together. In November, he told a suburban newspaper reporter that while he was satisfied with his contract, there was no money available to hire the proper staff. We aren’t talking about secretaries; he needed transportation experts. You don’t design a 110-mile system with special lanes and 23 stations on the back of a legal pad. He needed to hire professionals…and to be able to assure them that they would have a job for a while.

Last summer, Hertel told me his guess was that it would cost $2 to $3 million to do that. In state budget terms, that is chicken feed; less than the cost, say, of an addition to an office building. But, the legislature didn’t appropriate the money.

Eventually it was put into a supplemental appropriations bill, which never passed. My guess is that, mired in frustration, Hertel decided to return to the job where he knew he could make a positive impact. Technically, that doesn’t mean the RTA is dead. Paul Hillegonds, the chair of RTA’s board, expressed disappointment, but said a search would begin for a new CEO. But it is hard to imagine finding someone else with both the transportation expertise and political savvy needed to get it done.

What is frustrating is that – if this opportunity falls through – it will mean continuing a pattern of failure that has seen Michigan repeatedly leave hundreds of millions in federal transportation dollars on the table. Worse, these dollars will eventually go to other states. Indeed, Washington would foot half the cost of building the RTA. Last March, Hertel estimated that the total would be about $600 million. That sounds pricey, but not when you consider that the cost of any subway system would be at least $1 billion per mile.

The beauty of the fast bus system is that—if voters approve—it could be up and running in a handful of years. From a business and consumer standpoint, a rapid bus system makes sense. But in recent years, Michigan government has seldom missed an opportunity to, well, miss an opportunity.

Unless something changes, it looks like deja vu all over again.

Veteran journalist and national Emmy Award winner Jack Lessenberry teaches at Wayne State University, serves as Michigan Radio’s senior political analyst and writes regularly for several publications. He also serves as The Toledo Blade’s writing coach and ombudsman and is host of the weekly television show Deadline Now on WGTE-TV in Toledo.

Jack Lessenberry

Jack Lessenberry, the longtime head of journalism at Wayne State University, can be heard on his podcast on YouTube via the Zing Media Network. He also is a winner of a National Emmy Award for a 1994 Frontline documentary on Dr. Jack Kevorkian, has served as The Toledo Blade’s writing coach and ombudsman and is now a columnist for and a  consultant to both that newspaper and Block Communications, Inc. He is also the co-author of “The People’s Lawyer,” a biography of Frank Kelley, the nation’s longest-serving attorney general, and is working on a book on a pioneering newspaper family and race.

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Chuck Fellows
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Chuck Fellows

Yogi Berra is right on once again!

But, when you come to a fork in the road, take it!

And it looks like Michigan is going to have to take it – if anything is ever to get done.

Since our Constitution provides the opportunity for citizen initiative we may have to organize a non profit to specialize in “get things done initiatives” in order to provide direct instruction to the legislature on what citizens want done.

You know, they can observe a lot by just watching!

nancy falcone
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nancy falcone

Thanks for a well written article, I also am a big believer in mass transportation. Losing Mr. Hertel is certainly a disappointment, talk about brain drain.

James A. Bush
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James A. Bush

Michigan’s political leadership needs to remember our economic decline since the oil crunch of the 1970s . Too much of our income goes down the oil pipelines. Success as the motor capitol means making and selling , not driving; just as Milwaukee’s success as beer capitol means brewing and selling, not drinking. The oil industry is having to consume more of its own product just to produce more (look up EROEI — energy output/energy input). The trend for oil prices is up, which means more Michigan income down the pipeline. Transit is essential for our economic sustainability. God Bless Michigan!

Harvey bronstein
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Harvey bronstein

Which NBA team is the only one not Downtown? Yes, the Detroit Pistons. Which city is the only one not having public transportation from the Airport to Downtown? Oh, we already know that it’s Detroit. I am a strong believer in Downtown, but we need to do more.

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